Jump to content

[updated:] 2022 Helmet Laboratory Testing Performance Results


Ann
 Share

Recommended Posts

results.png.b478a075561892e301a940ab490d5b53.png

 

 

Helmet Laboratory performance results

 

NFL, NFLPA Release 2021 Helmet Laboratory Testing Performance Results
 

The NFL and NFL Players Association (NFLPA) released today their 2021 helmet laboratory testing performance results. As part of ongoing efforts to help players make informed choices about their protective equipment, this is the seventh year the league and the NFLPA have collaborated to assess the performance of all helmets worn by NFL players in reducing head impact severity as measured in laboratory testing. The results of these tests are displayed on a poster that is shared with NFL players and club medical, training, coaching and equipment staffs.
 

Ahead of the 2021 season, biomechanical engineers appointed by the NFL and NFLPA ranked 41 total helmet models, including three new models never tested before by the league. All three new helmet models are among the top 10 ranked models, suggesting that improvements in helmet design continue year over year. In addition, for the first time this year, NFL and NFLPA engineers tested a position-specific helmet – the VICIS ZERO2-R TRENCH, designed for linemen – and it ranked among the top three helmets according to the results of the laboratory testing.
 

As a result of the multi-year effort in which the NFL and NFLPA have worked together to test and rank helmets, NFL players have continued to upgrade their helmets to those which perform better at reducing head impact severity. Testing results have played an important role in players' equipment selection processes. The 2020 season was the second consecutive year that more than 99% of NFL players have chosen top-performing helmets.
 

"Players have more and better choices than ever before. Continued improvement in helmet design has raised the bar for top performing helmet models," said Jeff Miller, NFL Executive Vice President overseeing Player Health and Safety. "The introduction of the first position-specific helmet is a promising development within the helmet industry to further customize helmets for the unique safety requirements of each position. The NFL and NFLPA have long supported critical innovation in helmet design through our research and innovation challenges and by providing necessary data to manufacturers, and we're excited for that effort to yield tangible results."
 


</snip>

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 hours ago, Spartacus said:

as with other NFL safety items, most players (82%) couldn't care less about the improvements

 

will stick with "what I've always worn"

 

 



Mark Kelso adapted (after a number of concussions).

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 11 months later...
Arm of Harm

According to their chart, the difference between the best and worst helmets is noticeable, but not huge. On the one hand, I’m glad they’re making incremental improvements to the helmets. On the other hand, I feel like major improvement is unlikely until they move towards more revolutionary designs.

 

Two or three years ago I saw a video about new helmet designs. These new helmets had two important features. 1) The outer shell could move and rotate relative to the inner part of the helmet. This allowed the helmet to dissipate rotational force, instead of directly transmitting that force to the player’s head. 2) The new helmets were designed to crumple upon impact, much like a car crumples in a traffic accident. Unlike a car, however, these new helmets would un-crumple shortly after the impact. The crumpling helps cushion blows to the head. 
 

It’s my impression that revolutionary helmets like these are not among the ones being tested or put into use by the NFL. If I’m correct about that, it would mean Roger Goodell is doing a great disservice to the players. 
 

 

Edited by Arm of Harm
  • Like 1
  • Cheers 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Figster
On 3/24/2022 at 11:39 AM, Arm of Harm said:

According to their chart, the difference between the best and worst helmets is noticeable, but not huge. On the one hand, I’m glad they’re making incremental improvements to the helmets. On the other hand, I feel like major improvement is unlikely until they move towards more revolutionary designs.

 

Two or three years ago I saw a video about new helmet designs. These new helmets had two important features. 1) The outer shell could move and rotate relative to the inner part of the helmet. This allowed the helmet to dissipate rotational force, instead of directly transmitting that force to the player’s head. 2) The new helmets were designed to crumple upon impact, much like a car crumples in a traffic accident. Unlike a car, however, these new helmets would un-crumple shortly after the impact. The crumpling helps cushion blows to the head. 
 

It’s my impression that revolutionary helmets like these are not among the ones being tested or put into use by the NFL. If I’m correct about that, it would mean Roger Goodell is doing a great disservice to the players. 
 

 

I brought this up ten years ago on ATOP. The traditional hard shell exterior of a helmet doesn't give much on initial impact. So regardless of how much inner padding the helmet has, inside your head the brain still gets bounced around. You can't just make the exterior of a helmet softer to reduce the initial impact because the friction/cohesion on impact results in added rotational force. Most hard shelled exterior helmets are faulty in this manner including  motorcycle helmets IMO.

 

I'm in agreement with your last comment.

 

(I'm very happy to see designers have found a way to decrease the rotational force created on impact.)

Edited by Figster
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Terms of Use, Privacy Policy, We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue., Guidelines