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Ann
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Are you a hunter? Out for bow season in NYS right now? Hunting something else in a different state? 

Note: While I do have a fishing license, I am not a hunter but my husband is. I hate venison. ūüėõ
 

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, Ann said:

Are you a hunter? Out for bow season in NYS right now? Hunting something else in a different state? 

Note: While I do have a fishing license, I am not a hunter but my husband is. I hate venison. ūüėõ
 

 

 

 

 

Don't hunt but have a couple of buddies that bowhunt on my land.  The most deer I ever saw at 1 time here was 14.  They usually only harvest 2/ yr, but it helps.

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7 minutes ago, Taro T said:

 

Don't hunt but have a couple of buddies that bowhunt on my land.  The most deer I ever saw at 1 time here was 14.  They usually only harvest 2/ yr, but it helps.


Since we live in an area with a large deer population that can cause a lot of property and vehicle damage (not to mention killing or hurting people in that article), deer overpopulation is not a good thing (and we will not even go into them starving due to lack of food).  The rut starting in a few weeks always makes driving at dusk in this area very dicey.

Something I should post (my husband has done this in the past, it is super easy to do, but you do need to tag that donated deer):
 

Venison Donation
Hunters, You Can Help!
 

Visit the Venison Donation Coalition Farmers and Hunters Feeding the Hungry to learn how you can donate venison to help feed local families!

You may also help by making a cash donation when you purchase your hunting license. Cash donations are used to pay for the cost of processing donated venison.

Acquiring Venison Without Hunting

You don't have to be a hunter to enjoy high protein, low fat, and versatile wild game fare! Hunters may not sell venison or exchange goods or services for venison, but they can donate it to anyone they choose. Just ask a hunter, then Eat Local!
 

To make it easier on the hunter, you may opt to receive the whole deer and process it yourself or pay for a commercial processor to do it for you. Or the hunter could drop the deer off at the processor, and you could pay the processor when you pick up the packaged meat.
 

</snip>

How it works -

Hunters and farmers are able to donate an entire deer or a portion of their deer to the Venison Donation Coalition.  Click on Find a Processor to locate one near you.  CALL AHEAD to make sure the processor is open and accepting deer.  Once you have your deer properly field dressed and legally tagged, you can bring it to one of our processors near your home or where you hunt. Whole deer donations are greatly appreciated but not required.  There is NO COST TO THE HUNTER/FARMER for the processing fees of donated venison.

 

 

Donation processors (you drop off the field dressed deer with a tag for donation, and it is processed and donated free of cost to the hunter)

 

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1 hour ago, Ann said:


Since we live in an area with a large deer population that can cause a lot of property and vehicle damage (not to mention killing or hurting people in that article), deer overpopulation is not a good thing (and we will not even go into them starving due to lack of food).  The rut starting in a few weeks always makes driving at dusk in this area very dicey.

Something I should post (my husband has done this in the past, it is super easy to do, but you do need to tag that donated deer):
 

Venison Donation
Hunters, You Can Help!
 

Visit the Venison Donation Coalition Farmers and Hunters Feeding the Hungry to learn how you can donate venison to help feed local families!

You may also help by making a cash donation when you purchase your hunting license. Cash donations are used to pay for the cost of processing donated venison.

Acquiring Venison Without Hunting

You don't have to be a hunter to enjoy high protein, low fat, and versatile wild game fare! Hunters may not sell venison or exchange goods or services for venison, but they can donate it to anyone they choose. Just ask a hunter, then Eat Local!
 

To make it easier on the hunter, you may opt to receive the whole deer and process it yourself or pay for a commercial processor to do it for you. Or the hunter could drop the deer off at the processor, and you could pay the processor when you pick up the packaged meat.
 

</snip>

How it works -

Hunters and farmers are able to donate an entire deer or a portion of their deer to the Venison Donation Coalition.  Click on Find a Processor to locate one near you.  CALL AHEAD to make sure the processor is open and accepting deer.  Once you have your deer properly field dressed and legally tagged, you can bring it to one of our processors near your home or where you hunt. Whole deer donations are greatly appreciated but not required.  There is NO COST TO THE HUNTER/FARMER for the processing fees of donated venison.

 

 

Donation processors (you drop off the field dressed deer with a tag for donation, and it is processed and donated free of cost to the hunter)

 

Why do I feel you are posting the venison donation information for your husband? 

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5 hours ago, Ann said:

Are you a hunter? Out for bow season in NYS right now? Hunting something else in a different state? 

Note: While I do have a fishing license, I am not a hunter but my husband is. I hate venison. ūüėõ
 

 

 

 

 

We need that woman to run for President.

 

I went fishing for the first time in years this summer on Lake Tahoe....we had a great time.

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5 hours ago, Ann said:

Note: While I do have a fishing license, I am not a hunter but my husband is. I hate venison. ūüėõ¬†

 

1 hour ago, Ann said:


??

 

 

2 hours ago, Uncle Joe said:

Why do I feel you are posting the venison donation information for your husband? 


To the thread - As some were born into the Bills I was born into hunting and fishing. Though my father and brothers are more hunters than fisherman I am more fisherman than hunter. I too disliked venison growing up. It wasn't later when I cared for my own game that I could make it more tasty. Venison to me is like lamb, very rich.
Ten years ago I would have felt nekid without a 1/4 elk in the freezer. It is not a rich tasting as venison. Now I'd rather go buy a nice ribeye. Although I do miss 'hiking with gun' and all most of my experiences in the woods.
Also, I have plenty of fish in the freezer.  

Edited by Uncle Joe
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15 hours ago, Taro T said:

 

Don't hunt but have a couple of buddies that bowhunt on my land.  The most deer I ever saw at 1 time here was 14.  They usually only harvest 2/ yr, but it helps.

Where are you? I could take a 3rd to help you out.....I have often been called helpful

 

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15 hours ago, Ann said:

 

 

 

Donation processors (you drop off the field dressed deer with a tag for donation, and it is processed and donated free of cost to the hunter)

 

For those interested The one up by me called Spruce Acres is closed up. The couple retired.

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So I call myself a hunter. Truth is I just take my rifle for a 3 mile walk and spend some alone time with it in the woods. Built my house 27 years ago on a piece of the family land here in NNY so I have 300 acres of land in the back yard. I walk out, sit for a few hours, let the small ones and doe walk, walk back home and check out the new scratches on my bullets. Its what I do for fun.

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9 minutes ago, Fansince88 said:

Where are you? I could take a 3rd to help you out.....I have often been called helpful

 

 

Would have to be by bow.  Neighbors would freak if they heard a shotgun.

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4 minutes ago, Taro T said:

 

Would have to be by bow.  Neighbors would freak if they heard a shotgun.

HAHA! Crossbows work great for that too.

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1 hour ago, Fansince88 said:

So I call myself a hunter. Truth is I just take my rifle for a 3 mile walk and spend some alone time with it in the woods. Built my house 27 years ago on a piece of the family land here in NNY so I have 300 acres of land in the back yard. I walk out, sit for a few hours, let the small ones and doe walk, walk back home and check out the new scratches on my bullets. Its what I do for fun.


My husband would love to just fall out of the house onto hunting land. We have looked and looked, but unless we want to build a house (we'd end up divorced) he is stuck having to haul his hiney out of bed in the middle of the night to drive the 50 minutes to his hunting land, or down to the south towns to his buddy's land.  He tried to get a permit to put up a pole barn (he'd have made a room with bunks, incinerator toilet, bottle water sink, generator, etc) but the town where the land is located will not allow that - no ancillary building may be built without a main living structure.
 

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36 minutes ago, Ann said:


My husband would love to just fall out of the house onto hunting land. We have looked and looked, but unless we want to build a house (we'd end up divorced) he is stuck having to haul his hiney out of bed in the middle of the night to drive the 50 minutes to his hunting land, or down to the south towns to his buddy's land.  He tried to get a permit to put up a pole barn (he'd have made a room with bunks, incinerator toilet, bottle water sink, generator, etc) but the town where the land is located will not allow that - no ancillary building may be built without a main living structure.
 

Yup, That would suck

 

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I grew up hunting 75 acres my family owned right outside our back door. When I moved to South Carolina in 2012 I got out out of it, except for when I would come home for Thanksgiving. I wanted to hunt, but I was intimidated by the idea of having to knock on doors or hunt public land, as well the logistics of meat care in the southern heat. Last year I finally got to the point where I got sick of not hunting and bit the bullet on hunting public land. I ended up getting a small 8 pt in a spot I had to kayak into. So far this season I’ve had a couple close encounters but haven’t filled a tag. 

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On 10/18/2020 at 10:21 AM, Ann said:


My husband would love to just fall out of the house onto hunting land. We have looked and looked, but unless we want to build a house (we'd end up divorced) he is stuck having to haul his hiney out of bed in the middle of the night to drive the 50 minutes to his hunting land, or down to the south towns to his buddy's land.  He tried to get a permit to put up a pole barn (he'd have made a room with bunks, incinerator toilet, bottle water sink, generator, etc) but the town where the land is located will not allow that - no ancillary building may be built without a main living structure.
 

I may have a solution for you and your hubby.  
 

Down in Schoharie County (outside Cobleskill) there’s an area where custom home builders are plentiful, and the abundance of raw natural resources make it relatively inexpensive to find balance between the male/female emotional archipelago. 
 

For your husband, the deer are both plentiful and quite wily.  Stories of several day long hunts for a buck are commonplace, and respect between man and beast rules the day.  
 

Here‚Äôs the interesting¬†part‚ÄĒapparently commencing in the¬†late 1800s to just after the turn of the century,¬†I‚Äôm told, hundreds of thousand of common field¬†mice roamed the nearby ¬†Helderberg¬†Escarpment in search of acorns, berries and pine cones. ¬†For the locals, well,¬†it was only natural the the mouse would soon¬†be hunted for both it‚Äôs wiry coat and the succulent dark meat attached to its tiny frame. ¬†
 

Unfortunately, as so often happens, tales of grand hunts and mouse pelts by the hundreds soon caught the attention of professionals from across the country, and sadly, over time the common field mouse population dwindled until it is rare even to this day to see much more than a solitary and perhaps lonely mouse in a barn or gnawing on a hunk of Gouda discarded by the wealthy folk of Westchester County now flocking to the area. 
 

The bright side for you is that it’s highly unlikely that you will ever come face to face with the corpse of one of Gods most majestic (albeit minuscule)  yet largely misunderstood creatures.  Surely this should appeal to your scaredy cat nature, rodentially speaking of course.  

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I was brought up as a fisherman first and hunting later starting when I was 5 yrs. old. Still hunt & fish today and I'm 73 now.  I have a cabin +20 acres near Onoville,NY that I still hunt & has a great deer & bear population. Can still shoot a 1in. group @100 yds., so no problem hitting a deer.  I don't know how many more years I can walk those mountain hills but I love the sport and keep trying each year. Fishing here in Florida is great and so is trolling for walleye in WNY on Lake Erie from Barcelona Harbor to Pa. state line.

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I decided to put this here instead of the jokes thread since this is most likely happened.
Also, this shows how much some Oregonians dislike government overreach
Some history. In the 1970's you needed one deer or elk tag for the whole state. Now  it is subdivided into regions and numerous draws for elk and deer. Goose and duck hunting has been similarly restricted with federal and state requirements.
And then there are all the added fishing regulations.
 

ODFW.jpg

ODFW response.jpg

Edited by Uncle Joe
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