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Hurricane Ida : Government and Media Response.


B-Man
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I know we have a "general" Hurricane thread, but this looks to be the Current Event that we will all be talking about.

 

 

 

"Hurricane Ida made landfall in Louisiana on Sunday as a Category 4 storm.... The storm’s maximum sustained winds on Sunday morning reached 150 miles an hour, closing in on the 157 m.p.h. winds of a Category 5 storm...."

 

"The storm has New Orleans directly in its path.... The storm could also wreak serious havoc farther inland, in places like greater Baton Rouge, where a number of areas have been devastated by inland flooding in recent years from much less powerful storms. Hurricane Ida will bring 'extremely threatening storm surge inundation of 9 feet or higher' between Burns Point, La., and Ocean Springs, Miss., the Hurricane Center warned. In some places the surge could be as high as 16 feet.... 

 

Governor Edwards [said] 'We can sum it up by saying this will be one of the strongest hurricanes to hit anywhere in Louisiana since at least the 1850s'.... 

 

The storm made landfall on the 16th anniversary of the landfall of Hurricane Katrina....  The trajectory and strength of Ida will present a high-stakes test of the levees, flood walls, pumps and gates that were reinforced around New Orleans after Katrina.... ...

 

Mr. Edwards said that the pandemic had thwarted plans to evacuate hospitals. 'Evacuating these large hospitals is not an option because there are not any other hospitals with the capacity to take them'...."

 
 

https://www.nytimes.com/live/2021/08/29/us/hurricane-ida-live-updates-new-orleans-louisiana/the-storm-made-landfall-on-the-anniversary-of-hurricane-katrina

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54 minutes ago, B-Man said:

 

 

Why ? WHY ? must networks put 'reporters' in danger by putting them out in >100 mph winds for a "live report"

 

Idiots.

 

Some say "idiots."  Some say "good use of reporters."

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Wife's matron of honor is in Red Stick.  Some pretty frigging impressive photos already.  

 

Let's hope this doesn't end up as big a disaster as Katrina did.

 

Prayers to all in the storm & those w/ friends & family in harms way.

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12 hours ago, B-Man said:

 

 

Why ? WHY ? must networks put 'reporters' in danger by putting them out in >100 mph winds for a "live report"

 

Idiots.

 

11 hours ago, Crap Throwing Monkey said:

 

Some say "idiots."  Some say "good use of reporters."

 

I watched a report last night of one of those idiots pointing at a couple people telling how they shouldn't be out in that weather..... duh?

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I think the problem with a federal response is that Joe is way past his sleepy time so maybe he'll let someone else handle this disaster.... Kamala maybe? She needs to take on something and show competence before she steps in as POTUS.

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18 minutes ago, Cinga said:

 

 

I watched a report last night of one of those idiots pointing at a couple people telling how they shouldn't be out in that weather..... duh?

We watched it on one of our weather channels for a bit. Funny watching them do all they can to stand meanwhile people standing normal right behind them. One guy walked out behind his bucket truck with his hands on his hip looking around as if to say, when is the big stuff coming. That said, you cant dodge roofs when they fly off. 

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Now a tropical storm

 

Hurricane Ida weakened to a tropical storm Monday after crashing into Louisiana and knocking out power to more than 1 million homes and businesses including the city of New Orleans.

Officials earlier warned of "life-threatening" floods. At least one person, a 60-year-old man, died in Ascension Parish after a tree fell on his home.

 

Electric utilities reported that slightly more than 1 million homes and businesses were without power in Louisiana and another 100,000 in Mississippi. Entergy New Orleans, the main power utility in the city, with nearly 200,000 customers, said the entire city lost electricity early Sunday evening because of "catastrophic damage" to its transmission system. It said power wouldn't be restored Sunday night.

 

The National Hurricane Center said that the rain and storm surge has "resulted in catastrophic impacts along the southeast coast of Louisiana." It warned of a dangerous storm surges and flash floods around southeastern Louisiana and southern Mississippi after Ida made landfall as one of the strongest storms in U.S. history. It also said tornadoes were possible into the evening from Mississippi to the western Florida Panhandle.

 

 

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11 hours ago, IDBillzFan said:

Image

And if the occupant of the White House were a member of the other party, this would be a super storm.  Administrative failure and incompetence.  People literally being killed.

 

Funny how the tone of The Narrative changes based on party registration

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Total damage and economic loss from Hurricane Ida will fall between $70B and $80B: Accuweather expert
Power outages could last for a week or longer and will result in a near complete shutdown of New Orleans and surrounding cities and towns


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The weather service, which predicted significant wind damage along with storm surge and inland flooding with mass power outages, believes the power outages could last for a week or longer and will result in a near complete shutdown of New Orleans and surrounding cities and towns, Meyers said.
 

"Power outages will exacerbate extreme discomfort" caused by heat and humidity and will result in mold growth in impacted areas, he added, in addition to issues for people who rely on electronic medical equipment, such as CPAP machines.
 

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However, Louisiana will not be the only state affected by the storm, as areas hit by previous hurricanes Fred and Henri like Mississippi and Tennessee will also experience additional flooding which may be extensive and dangerous in some areas as rapidly rising water will continue to be hazardous to lives and properties in those areas causing infrastructure damage and disruption to lives.
 

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"Oil production and refining along the Gulf Coast will certainly be impacted," Myers said, adding "the hurricane has had the effect of increasing the ‘crack spread,’ or the difference between the price of crude oil and the petroleum products produced from it, such as gasoline and home heating oil." 
 

"This is because a significant amount of the refinery capacity in Louisiana and has been offline, and some refineries may remain offline for a significant amount of time," he said. "Increases to the price of gasoline create a negative impact on the economy."
 

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Ida’s sweltering aftermath: No power, no water, no gasoline
 

Hundreds of thousands of Louisianans sweltered in the aftermath of Hurricane Ida on Tuesday with no electricity, no tap water, precious little gasoline and no clear idea of when things might improve.
 

Long lines that wrapped around the block formed at the few gas stations that had fuel and generator power to pump it. People cleared rotting food out of refrigerators. Neighbors shared generators and borrowed buckets of swimming pool water to bathe or to flush toilets.
 

“We have a lot of work ahead of us and no one is under the illusion that this is going to be a short process,” Gov. John Bel Edwards said as the cleanup and rebuilding began across the soggy region in the oppressive late-summer heat.
 

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Some customers in New Orleans East get power restored after Hurricane Ida Wednesday morning
 

The first lights came back on in the New Orleans area since Hurricane Ida early Wednesday morning, with Entergy announcing it had restored power to a limited area in New Orleans East.
 

The company was able to bring those customers back using electricity from the New Orleans Power Station, a natural gas plant in New Orleans East, according to a press release from the utility.
 

"While initial service can be provided to some customers, the full restoration will still take time given the significant damage across the region," according to the press release. "Crews will have to methodically bring back additional transmission lines over time to provide other pathways for power to enter the region, helping to maintain stability of the system throughout the complete restoration process."
 

More than 200,000 homes and businesses get their power from Entergy New Orleans. After the first power was restored Wednesday morning, Entergy's outage tracker reported about 173,000 were still without power. It was not immediately clear whether that figure was accurate since there have been errors on Entergy's outage map since Ida.
 

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On 8/29/2021 at 5:49 PM, Crap Throwing Monkey said:

 

Some say "idiots."  Some say "good use of reporters."

 

Nothing says stupid like listening to a reporter, leaning into the force of some maelstrom, imploring the listeners to heed the warnings of officials to stay inside and shelter in place.

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