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ComradeKayAdams

Welcome! This is the place to share memories of past games, seasons, players, tailgates, and other Bills-related experiences. This is also the place for historical analyses. Post articles, pictures, video links, personal stories, and historical accounts. Older fans are especially encouraged to share their thoughts! Consider this thread to be for the Buffalo Bills franchise what Tacitus’ “Annals” was for the Roman Empire. General discussion of NFL history and football history is considered fair game as well. There need not be any particular rhyme or reason to whatever you choose to post here, really.

 

As soon as I find the time and inspiration this holiday weekend, I plan on typing up a history-based musing dedicated to our Bills. In the meantime, I have two fun (well…maybe just for me, anyway) historical analysis projects to share. I’ll post the second one tomorrow. The first is a ranking of Buffalo’s biggest rivals, from a historical perspective but with a dash of recency bias:

 

1. *Patriots (their 21st century domination of us, all of the cheating, the “Just Give it to Them” game, Lou Saban’s former team, Buffalo’s first ever playoff opponent, Hank Bullough was their DC during the 1970’s)

2. Dolphins (their 1970’s domination of us, the Marino versus Kelly arch-rivalry and the four playoff games, the cultural differences between the two cities, Miami was Ralph Wilson’s first choice for a franchise location)

3. Jets (being in the same division for 61 years, the 1981 playoff game, downstate rivals, the cultural differences between the two cities, the Rex Ryan connection)

4. Titans (the Music City Miracle game, The Comeback game, Ralph’s rivalry with Bud Adams, Vrabel’s COVID-19 mismanagement, their +11 historical regular season win differential over Buffalo, AFL division rivals, their bequeathment of Gregg Williams)

5. Chiefs (the McDermott versus Reid protege-mentor relationship, passing on Mahomes in the draft, our “chief” AFL rival, Kelly versus Montana conference championship game, the Schottenheimer connection, the Levy connection)

6. Steelers (the William & Mary rivalry of McDermott versus Tomlin, the three playoff games, the tragic 2004 season-ending loss, the geographic proximity, the cultural similarities between the two cities, the Tom Donahoe and Mike Mularkey connections, the Pegula regional connections, the homeland of QB’s like Jim Kelly and Alex Van Pelt and Richie Lucas plus coaches like Chuck Knox and Ted Marchibroda)

7. Chargers (a major AFL rival, the playoff loss to Fouts, the pilfering of John Butler, their +13 historical regular season win differential over Buffalo, SoCal’s many threats of stealing our NFL franchise after having stolen our NBA team)

8. Cowboys (the two Super Bowl losses, the diametrically opposed cultures of the two cities)

9. Browns (the geographic proximity, the cultural similarities between the two cities, the Ronnie Harmon playoff game, the rivalry with our post-WW2 AAFC Buffalo franchise, the Mayfield versus Allen QB class of 2018 dynamic, all of those terribly boring games during the Drought Era)

10. Jaguars (the two playoff losses, the Marrone connection, Ramsey versus Allen, Boselli versus Smith)

11. Raiders (the Al Davis rivalry dating back to the 1960’s, the team’s longstanding reputation for playing dirty, the lopsided Lamonica trade, the John Rauch connection)

12. Colts (a former division rival)

13. Texans (the playoff loss last year, the old Oilers rivalry with the city of Houston)

14. Broncos (the Kelly versus Elway rivalry, Lou Saban and Joe Collier went there later, the Wade Phillips connection)

15. Bengals (the two playoff losses in the 1980’s, a softened rivalry from all of the 2017 Dalton love)

16. Bears (the 1921 Staley Swindle, predominantly the rivalry with the 1920’s Buffalo NFL franchise, the Dick Jauron connection, Marv Levy’s native city)

17. Giants (the SB 25 loss to Parcells and Belichick, a downstate rival)

18. Football Team (the SB 26 loss)

19. Seahawks (their city almost stole our franchise in the early 70’s, they stole Chuck Knox)

20. Lions (the geographic proximity, Ralph Wilson’s home region, Ralph was once a minority owner of the franchise, I think we stole their uniforms during our franchise’s first two years of existence, the Buster Ramsey connection)

21. Panthers (the former home of McDermott and Beane, the Bill Polian connection)

22. Ravens (the old divisional rivalry with the city of Baltimore)

23-31. rest of NFC (meh.)

 

Your thoughts?? What changes would you make to the order of the teams?

 

EDIT: I changed the title of my thread! Wooo!

Edited by ComradeKayAdams
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1 hour ago, ComradeKayAdams said:

Welcome! This is the place to share memories of past games, seasons, players, tailgates, and other Bills-related experiences. This is also the place for historical analyses. Post articles, pictures, video links, personal stories, and historical accounts. Older fans are especially encouraged to share their thoughts! Consider this thread to be for the Buffalo Bills franchise what Tacitus’ “Annals” was for the Roman Empire. General discussion of NFL history and football history is considered fair game as well. There need not be any particular rhyme or reason to whatever you choose to post here, really.

 

As soon as I find the time and inspiration this holiday weekend, I plan on typing up a history-based musing dedicated to our Bills. In the meantime, I have two fun (well…maybe just for me, anyway) historical analysis projects to share. I’ll post the second one tomorrow. The first is a ranking of Buffalo’s biggest rivals, from a historical perspective but with a dash of recency bias:

 

1. **Patriots (their 21st century domination of us, all of the cheating, the “Just Give it to Them” game, Lou Saban’s former team, Buffalo’s first ever playoff opponent, Hank Bullough was their DC during the 1970’s)

2. Dolphins (their 1970’s domination of us, the Marino versus Kelly arch-rivalry and the four playoff games, the cultural differences between the two cities, Miami was Ralph Wilson’s first choice for a franchise location)

3. Jets (being in the same division for 61 years, the 1981 playoff game, downstate rivals, the cultural differences between the two cities, the Rex Ryan connection)

4. Titans (the Music City Miracle game, The Comeback game, Ralph’s rivalry with Bud Adams, Vrabel’s COVID-19 mismanagement, their +11 historical regular season win differential over Buffalo, AFL division rivals, their bequeathment of Gregg Williams)

5. Chiefs (the McDermott versus Reid protege-mentor relationship, passing on Mahomes in the draft, our “chief” AFL rival, Kelly versus Montana conference championship game, the Schottenheimer connection, the Levy connection)

6. Steelers (the William & Mary rivalry of McDermott versus Tomlin, the three playoff games, the tragic 2004 season-ending loss, the geographic proximity, the cultural similarities between the two cities, the Tom Donahoe and Mike Mularkey connections, the Pegula regional connections, the homeland of QB’s like Jim Kelly and Alex Van Pelt and Richie Lucas plus coaches like Chuck Knox and Ted Marchibroda)

7. Chargers (a major AFL rival, the playoff loss to Fouts, the pilfering of John Butler, their +13 historical regular season win differential over Buffalo, SoCal’s many threats of stealing our NFL franchise after having stolen our NBA team)

8. Cowboys (the two Super Bowl losses, the diametrically opposed cultures of the two cities)

9. Browns (the geographic proximity, the cultural similarities between the two cities, the Ronnie Harmon playoff game, the rivalry with our post-WW2 AAFC Buffalo franchise, the Mayfield versus Allen QB class of 2018 dynamic, all of those terribly boring games during the Drought Era)

10. Jaguars (the two playoff losses, the Marrone connection, Ramsey versus Allen, Boselli versus Smith)

11. Raiders (the Al Davis rivalry dating back to the 1960’s, the team’s longstanding reputation for playing dirty, the lopsided Lamonica trade, the John Rauch connection)

12. Colts (a former division rival)

13. Texans (the playoff loss last year, the old Oilers rivalry with the city of Houston)

14. Broncos (the Kelly versus Elway rivalry, Lou Saban and Joe Collier went there later, the Wade Phillips connection)

15. Bengals (the two playoff losses in the 1980’s, a softened rivalry from all of the 2017 Dalton love)

16. Bears (the 1921 Staley Swindle, predominantly the rivalry with the 1920’s Buffalo NFL franchise, the Dick Jauron connection, Marv Levy’s native city)

17. Giants (the SB 25 loss to Parcells and Belichick, a downstate rival)

18. Football Team (the SB 26 loss)

19. Seahawks (their city almost stole our franchise in the early 70’s, they stole Chuck Knox)

20. Lions (the geographic proximity, Ralph Wilson’s home region, Ralph was once a minority owner of the franchise, I think we stole their uniforms during our franchise’s first two years of existence, the Buster Ramsey connection)

21. Panthers (the former home of McDermott and Beane, the Bill Polian connection)

22. Ravens (the old divisional rivalry with the city of Baltimore)

23-31. rest of NFC (meh.)

 

Your thoughts?? What changes would you make to the order of the teams?

  The Bills-*Patriots series was very even before BB and Marsha.  I think that things would not have gone so lopsided in favor of the *Patriots if Ralph Wilson was more capable in terms of finding someone to manage football operations for the Bills.  I'm thankful that Ralph wrote an excellent final chapter to his ownership in terms of keeping the team in Buffalo but the last 10-15 years of his control hurt the product on the field.

 

  The Oilers were always a pain in our side when we needed a win.  I do miss them as an identity in the NFL and Houston should have been allowed to maintain it after Adams left for Tenn..

 

  Ralph and Lamar Hunt were good friends so the Chiefs were always in good standing with me.

 

  I'm not complaining but it always surprised me that the Jets did not have more success over the history of that franchise.  Leon Hess always had the resources for better in terms of staff and front office (plus players before the cap era) but at least he could better restrain himself from hasty moves (and temper tantrums) unlike Bud Adams.  Bills-Jets series has been consistently even the last few decades.

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2 hours ago, Boyst said:

You forgot the 31-0 beat down of the **Patriots. Best game I ever went to.

I was riding back from Newark airport after a trip to Germany that day. I couldn't believe that score. Missed the whole game, but it was some win. Of course the season ender was the reverse score. Friggin' BB. :handbags:

 

Great write up ComradeKay! Thanks for joining here. Good insightful writing is appreciated here.

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Fish will always be the biggest rivalry.  At one point, we were 6-34-1 against them.  Read that again. 

 

Mark my words, 10 years from now you'll be able to drop a nuke on Boston and not kill a *Patriots' fan.  They'll be back to rooting for the Giants.

 

I hate Tampa Bay because they ruined Sam Cowart's promising career as it was really starting to take off...and because Marsha landed there.  &#%$ those &#%$ers.

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5 hours ago, Alaska Darin said:

Fish will always be the biggest rivalry.  At one point, we were 6-34-1 against them.  Read that again. 

 

Mark my words, 10 years from now you'll be able to drop a nuke on Boston and not kill a **Patriots' fan.  They'll be back to rooting for the Giants.

 

I hate Tampa Bay because they ruined Sam Cowart's promising career as it was really starting to take off...and because Marsha landed there.  &#%$ those &#%$ers.

 

Tampa also was the team the Bills lost to in '88 to make sure they couldn't get home field against Cincy that year.  And also the home of SB XXV.  F### the Bucs.

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ComradeKayAdams

Season’s greetings, Bills fans of Billsfans(.com)!

 

This is my second historical analysis project. It is a little more involved than the first. The inspiration comes from several NFL history articles that I read over the summer. They got me thinking about Buffalo’s AFL dynasty of the mid-60’s and its AFC dynasty of the early 90’s. Even though they never won Super Bowls, they still achieved a lot and are worthy of our pride and respect. So just how “great” were they? The following analysis is my attempt to position these two cherished teams within the context of pro football history. I’ll revisit this unfinished project during the offseason, but anyone who wants to take it up in the meantime is more than welcome to do so!

 

First, how are we to define and measure a team’s “greatness,” anyway? One needs to have some sort of scoring system if one wants to compare teams from different eras. The scoring system is the most important part of my historical analysis project, so your feedback is encouraged! I’m presenting a draft of one below, as it is currently conceived in my head, so that you get a better sense of what I think we should value and prioritize. Pay attention to the value ratios and to the value equivalencies. Championships and time lengths of success are paramount, of course, but I also want to support the teams whose qualitative legacies can’t be quantitatively measured solely in terms of trophies and win/loss records. So to that effect, I’ve introduced (admittedly horribly subjective) bonus points for the last three items on my criteria list. Later on, I’ll need to somehow employ tiers of bonus points for these factors. Also, be aware that the NFL and the Pro Football Hall of Fame both officially recognize AFC/NFC conference titles as equivalent to pre-1970 AFL/NFL league titles. This helps us compare the pre-1966 teams with the Super Bowl era teams. Without further ado:

 

1. Regular season records: 1 point for each season between 0.500-0.625 (i.e. a 9-7 or 10-6 record), 2 points for each between 0.625-0.750 (i.e. 11-5 or 12-4), 4 points for each above 0.750 (13-3, 14-2, or 15-1), 8 points for going undefeated (1934 Bears, 1942 Bears, 1948 AAFC Browns, 1972 Dolphins, 2007 *Patriots), +1 bonus point for each division title.

2. Postseason performances: 2 points for a wild-card round victory followed by a loss in the divisional round, 5 points for a conference final loss or a pre-Super Bowl era title game loss, 12 points for a Super Bowl loss or a pre-Super Bowl era title game victory, 27 points for a Super Bowl victory, +3 bonus points for a league title before the 1966 season.

3. Hall of Famers: 1 point for any minor role player (such as Lofton for the Bills), 3 points for a “contributor” (owner or GM), 5 points for a major role player, 10 points for a head coach, +5 bonus points for a major role player at the QB position.

4. League development bonus points: reserved for teams that helped revolutionize the NFL’s organizational structure and intra-team protocols. Examples: Lambeau Packers, Halas Bears, Paul Brown’s Browns, Ewbank/Shula Colts, and Lombardi Packers. I would include our 1960’s Bills because they played a critical role in legitimizing the fledgling AFL with their more traditional style of successful football, relative to the rest of the league at that time.

5. X’s and O’s bonus points: reserved for teams that innovated the modern (post-1932) era of pro football from a strategic and schematic viewpoint. Examples: Hank Stram Chiefs, Don Shula Dolphins (3-4 D), Bill Walsh 49ers (West Coast O), Buddy Ryan Bears (46 D), and Mike Martz Rams (Greatest Show on Turf). I would include our early 1990’s Bills for the no-huddle K-Gun offense.

6. Cultural impact bonus points: reserved for teams that extended the sport’s popularity beyond football fans and into American culture. Examples: Tom Landry Cowboys, Al Davis Raiders, Chuck Noll Steelers, Brett Favre Packers, and Peyton Manning Colts. I would include the Sean McDermott Bills for winning the Super Bowl during the COVID-19 pandemic and elevating the spirits of all Americans everywhere (outside perhaps Kansas City). Yeah that’s right…I went there…

 

Next, I have decided to temporally define each team by either a marquee player (i.e. a QB) or a dominant head coach. Look no further than the 2020 season to see why I choose to define successful football organizations this way. Who are the top 10 teams this year? I’d say KC, Buffalo, Green Bay, New Orleans, Seattle, Tennessee, Pittsburgh, Baltimore, Tampa Bay, and Indianapolis (no offense to Cleveland, Miami, Arizona, or the Rams). 6 of those top 10 feature likely Hall of Fame QB’s, Mahomes is Mahomes, Allen and Tannehill are having amazing seasons, and Jackson was last year’s MVP. Also, think about the 7 Super Bowl-winning head coaches working in the NFL right now: 5 of them are in my 2020 top 10, while the other 2 are Belichick and Pederson (whose QB situations have been complete disasters this year).

 

Ok, so a rough guess of how the ranking may end up once a scoring system is finalized:

 

1. Marsha *Patriots, 2001-2019 **

2. Montana + Young 49ers, 1981-1998 **

3. Noll Steelers, 1972-1990 **

4. Lombardi Packers, 1959-1967

5. Aikman Cowboys, 1991-1998

6. Paul Brown + Blanton Collier Browns, 1946-1969 **

7. Halas Bears, 1920-1967 **

8. Lambeau Packers, 1921-1947 **

9. Landry Cowboys, 1966-1985 **

10. Davis + Rauch + Madden + Flores Raiders, 1963-1985 **

11. Shula Dolphins, 1970-1995 **

12. Gibbs Redskins, 1982-1992

13. Elway Broncos, 1983-1998 **

14. Unitas Colts, 1957-1971 **

15. Roethlisberger Steelers, 2004-ONGOING **

16. Parcells Giants, 1984-1990

17. Grant Vikings, 1968-1982 **

18. KELLY BILLS, 1988-1996

19. Warner Rams, 1999-2004

20. Carroll Seahawks, 2010-ONGOING

21. Manning Colts, 1999-2010

22. Stram Chiefs, 1960-1973

23. Favre Packers, 1992-2007 **

24. Ditka Bears, 1984-1991

25. Manning Giants, 2005-2016

26. Manning Broncos, 2011-2016

27. Rodgers Packers, 2009-ONGOING

28. Brees Saints, 2006-ONGOING **

29. Reid Chiefs, 2013-ONGOING

30. KEMP BILLS, 1962-1966

31. ALLEN BILLS, 2019-ONGOING (oh that’s right…I went there again…)

 

** - Double asterisks denote timespans that will likely be split into separate eras (perhaps into pairings of 1 QB + 1 HC). The timespans spanning 15+ years bother me. For now, I’m erring on the side of caution by including more seasons than what some might consider reasonable. Eventually I intend to better specify the criteria used to constrain durations of consecutive seasons. Any advice?

 

Can you think of any teams I overlooked in my list of 30 (er, 31!) that you want me to put in the queue? Remember that we’re only interested in teams that could be considered historically greater than the AFL Bills!

 

Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays, everyone!!!

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3 hours ago, ComradeKayAdams said:

Season’s greetings, Bills fans of Billsfans(.com)!

 

This is my second historical analysis project. It is a little more involved than the first. The inspiration comes from several NFL history articles that I read over the summer. They got me thinking about Buffalo’s AFL dynasty of the mid-60’s and its AFC dynasty of the early 90’s. Even though they never won Super Bowls, they still achieved a lot and are worthy of our pride and respect. So just how “great” were they? The following analysis is my attempt to position these two cherished teams within the context of pro football history. I’ll revisit this unfinished project during the offseason, but anyone who wants to take it up in the meantime is more than welcome to do so!

 

First, how are we to define and measure a team’s “greatness,” anyway? One needs to have some sort of scoring system if one wants to compare teams from different eras. The scoring system is the most important part of my historical analysis project, so your feedback is encouraged! I’m presenting a draft of one below, as it is currently conceived in my head, so that you get a better sense of what I think we should value and prioritize. Pay attention to the value ratios and to the value equivalencies. Championships and time lengths of success are paramount, of course, but I also want to support the teams whose qualitative legacies can’t be quantitatively measured solely in terms of trophies and win/loss records. So to that effect, I’ve introduced (admittedly horribly subjective) bonus points for the last three items on my criteria list. Later on, I’ll need to somehow employ tiers of bonus points for these factors. Also, be aware that the NFL and the Pro Football Hall of Fame both officially recognize AFC/NFC conference titles as equivalent to pre-1970 AFL/NFL league titles. This helps us compare the pre-1966 teams with the Super Bowl era teams. Without further ado:

 

1. Regular season records: 1 point for each season between 0.500-0.625 (i.e. a 9-7 or 10-6 record), 2 points for each between 0.625-0.750 (i.e. 11-5 or 12-4), 4 points for each above 0.750 (13-3, 14-2, or 15-1), 8 points for going undefeated (1934 Bears, 1942 Bears, 1948 AAFC Browns, 1972 Dolphins, 2007 **Patriots), +1 bonus point for each division title.

2. Postseason performances: 2 points for a wild-card round victory followed by a loss in the divisional round, 5 points for a conference final loss or a pre-Super Bowl era title game loss, 12 points for a Super Bowl loss or a pre-Super Bowl era title game victory, 27 points for a Super Bowl victory, +3 bonus points for a league title before the 1966 season.

3. Hall of Famers: 1 point for any minor role player (such as Lofton for the Bills), 3 points for a “contributor” (owner or GM), 5 points for a major role player, 10 points for a head coach, +5 bonus points for a major role player at the QB position.

4. League development bonus points: reserved for teams that helped revolutionize the NFL’s organizational structure and intra-team protocols. Examples: Lambeau Packers, Halas Bears, Paul Brown’s Browns, Ewbank/Shula Colts, and Lombardi Packers. I would include our 1960’s Bills because they played a critical role in legitimizing the fledgling AFL with their more traditional style of successful football, relative to the rest of the league at that time.

5. X’s and O’s bonus points: reserved for teams that innovated the modern (post-1932) era of pro football from a strategic and schematic viewpoint. Examples: Hank Stram Chiefs, Don Shula Dolphins (3-4 D), Bill Walsh 49ers (West Coast O), Buddy Ryan Bears (46 D), and Mike Martz Rams (Greatest Show on Turf). I would include our early 1990’s Bills for the no-huddle K-Gun offense.

6. Cultural impact bonus points: reserved for teams that extended the sport’s popularity beyond football fans and into American culture. Examples: Tom Landry Cowboys, Al Davis Raiders, Chuck Noll Steelers, Brett Favre Packers, and Peyton Manning Colts. I would include the Sean McDermott Bills for winning the Super Bowl during the COVID-19 pandemic and elevating the spirits of all Americans everywhere (outside perhaps Kansas City). Yeah that’s right…I went there…

 

Next, I have decided to temporally define each team by either a marquee player (i.e. a QB) or a dominant head coach. Look no further than the 2020 season to see why I choose to define successful football organizations this way. Who are the top 10 teams this year? I’d say KC, Buffalo, Green Bay, New Orleans, Seattle, Tennessee, Pittsburgh, Baltimore, Tampa Bay, and Indianapolis (no offense to Cleveland, Miami, Arizona, or the Rams). 6 of those top 10 feature likely Hall of Fame QB’s, Mahomes is Mahomes, Allen and Tannehill are having amazing seasons, and Jackson was last year’s MVP. Also, think about the 7 Super Bowl-winning head coaches working in the NFL right now: 5 of them are in my 2020 top 10, while the other 2 are Belichick and Pederson (whose QB situations have been complete disasters this year).

 

Ok, so a rough guess of how the ranking may end up once a scoring system is finalized:

 

1. Marsha **Patriots, 2001-2019 **

2. Montana + Young 49ers, 1981-1998 **

3. Noll Steelers, 1972-1990 **

4. Lombardi Packers, 1959-1967

5. Aikman Cowboys, 1991-1998

6. Paul Brown + Blanton Collier Browns, 1946-1969 **

7. Halas Bears, 1920-1967 **

8. Lambeau Packers, 1921-1947 **

9. Landry Cowboys, 1966-1985 **

10. Davis + Rauch + Madden + Flores Raiders, 1963-1985 **

11. Shula Dolphins, 1970-1995 **

12. Gibbs Redskins, 1982-1992

13. Elway Broncos, 1983-1998 **

14. Unitas Colts, 1957-1971 **

15. Roethlisberger Steelers, 2004-ONGOING **

16. Parcells Giants, 1984-1990

17. Grant Vikings, 1968-1982 **

18. KELLY BILLS, 1988-1996

19. Warner Rams, 1999-2004

20. Carroll Seahawks, 2010-ONGOING

21. Manning Colts, 1999-2010

22. Stram Chiefs, 1960-1973

23. Favre Packers, 1992-2007 **

24. Ditka Bears, 1984-1991

25. Manning Giants, 2005-2016

26. Manning Broncos, 2011-2016

27. Rodgers Packers, 2009-ONGOING

28. Brees Saints, 2006-ONGOING **

29. Reid Chiefs, 2013-ONGOING

30. KEMP BILLS, 1962-1966

31. ALLEN BILLS, 2019-ONGOING (oh that’s right…I went there again…)

 

** - Double asterisks denote timespans that will likely be split into separate eras (perhaps into pairings of 1 QB + 1 HC). The timespans spanning 15+ years bother me. For now, I’m erring on the side of caution by including more seasons than what some might consider reasonable. Eventually I intend to better specify the criteria used to constrain durations of consecutive seasons. Any advice?

 

Can you think of any teams I overlooked in my list of 30 (er, 31!) that you want me to put in the queue? Remember that we’re only interested in teams that could be considered historically greater than the AFL Bills!

 

Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays, everyone!!!

I don’t know that they’d score all that well in your system as they really only had a couple good seasons, but I think the Namath Jets should be looked at in the analysis due to the significance of being the first AFL team to win a Super Bowl.

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I seem  to remember that  playoff game  with KC was Montana's last. He got a concussion that knocked him out of the game. He said he had a high pitched wine in his ears after that hit  and that was a big influence  in making him decide to retire. I believe it was Wright, Bruce and someone else that leveled him.

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7 hours ago, Wacka said:

I seem  to remember that  playoff game  with KC was Montana's last. He got a concussion that knocked him out of the game. He said he had a high pitched wine in his ears after that hit  and that was a big influence  in making him decide to retire. I believe it was Wright, Bruce and someone else that leveled him.

Hanson.  Joe was once again unable to play in the elements.  Him getting knocked out gave KC a chance to get back into that game.  Dave Krieg significantly outplayed him in relief.

 

Special thanks to Kimball Anders for whiffing on an easy TD pass late in the first half (which turned into a Henry Jones interception). 

Edited by Alaska Darin
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ComradeKayAdams
On 12/24/2020 at 9:28 PM, Chandemonium said:

I don’t know that they’d score all that well in your system as they really only had a couple good seasons, but I think the Namath Jets should be looked at in the analysis due to the significance of being the first AFL team to win a Super Bowl.

 

Thank you so much for the feedback, Chandemonium! The 1967-69 Jets certainly qualify as a “great” team, but I’m expecting them to fall a bit short of the 1962-66 Bills once I finalize my scoring system. As you noticed, I place a high value on achieving demonstrable excellence for a sustained period of time. The Namath + Ewbank Jets will score very well in the league development, cultural impact, and Hall of Famers categories. However, those category points should be considered supplemental and useful mostly for tiebreakers among similarly accomplished teams. This is especially true for the Hall of Famers category, since that is basically just a formal recognition of achievement in the other categories. But thanks again for the recommendation, since one-hit wonders like the 1968 Jets will help me calibrate my scoring system! Yay!!

 

And on that note, after much holiday weekend contemplation…I present to you, dear readers, the most recent changes to my precious scoring system:

 

1. Hall of Famers: Points for “contributors” have dropped from 3 to 1. Points for non-QB players have dropped from 5 to 3. Points for both QB’s and head coaches have dropped from 10 to 6.

 

2. Qualitative bonus points: I’m introducing 4 impact tiers. A minor contribution will be worth 1 point, a moderate one will be worth 2 points, a major one 4 points, and the #1 ranking in each category will be worth 7 points (Halas’ Bears in league development, Walsh’s 49’ers in strategy, and Landry’s Cowboys in cultural impact). I suppose I’ll have to put together a bonus points “scorecard” for all 30+ teams…ugh…you see, this is why I’m pushing this history project into the offseason.

 

3. Regular season W’s and L’s: 3 points will be rewarded for each record between 0.750-0.875 (13-3 or 14-2). 4 points will go to each record between 0.875-1.000 (15-1 or 16-0). I’m minimizing all jumps in points between records since many good teams end up resting their starters after clinching playoff spots, anyway. I have lost interest in rewarding the 5 undefeated teams because the Bears did it twice but also lost their playoff game both times, the Browns did it in an inferior AAFC league, the 1972 Dolphins probably deserve to lose points for poor sportsmanship, and the 2007 *Patriots probably deserve to lose points for cheating. Also, if I can’t come up with sound reasoning on how to split up or pare down the mega-dynasties (the ones lasting 15+ consecutive seasons), I may just take their points-per-season average (that is, points in my regular season W/L scoring system category) and multiply by a capped length of 15. I will reward dynasties for length, but only up to a point until they begin to overwhelm the rest of the competition simply because I couldn’t figure out a way to delineate franchise epochs.

 

4. Postseason: I intensely dislike penalizing the 1920-1965 foundational era teams for not having the opportunity to win Super Bowls, so I’m modifying my +3 bonus points for all pre-1966 league titles. For now, I’ll adjust it to +5 each for AFL titles (1 title for the Chiefs, 2 for the Bills), AAFC titles (4 for the Browns), and 1920-1931 NFL titles without postseason play (2 for the Bears, 3 for the Lambeau Packers). 1932-1965 NFL titles will each receive +10 (2 titles for the Colts, 3 for the Lambeau Packers, 3 for the Lombardi Packers, 4 for the Browns, 6 for the Bears). Note that I have a Super Bowl victory as being worth +15, so you can think of these bonus points as probability points awarded for winning a hypothetically played pre-1966 Super Bowl (examples: 2 to 1 odds for the 1964 Bills beating the Browns or the 1965 Bills beating the Packers). Later on, I may consider something more fancy like awarding these points based on Nate Silver’s ELO ratings or PFR’s SRS ratings. Remember that we’re evaluating team “greatness” by dominance over peers and by enduring impact on the sport, NOT on who would beat whom in an imaginary game played today. Obviously even the 2017 Browns and 2008 Lions would annihilate the Lambeau Packers and Halas Bears, for example…

 

By the way, I want to remind everyone that you should feel free to post anything in this thread that is even tangentially related to Bills history. It doesn’t have to be a response to whatever sub-topic I raise. I realize this isn’t exactly the sexiest thread topic during the regular season lol…but I hope there continues to be some small level of participation. Special words of posting encouragement go out to 20th century Bills material and to personal experiences from the older fanbase…especially for all the esoteric stuff (think: less Kemp and Kelly, more Darragh and Ferragamo)! At some point after tonight’s game against the New England Asterisks, I intend to post a personalized eulogy for the 2000-2016 Drought Era Bills. It’s something I have felt compelled to do since last weekend’s highly emotional and historically significant Broncos game.

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On 12/24/2020 at 5:39 PM, ComradeKayAdams said:

Season’s greetings, Bills fans of Billsfans(.com)!

 

This is my second historical analysis project. It is a little more involved than the first. The inspiration comes from several NFL history articles that I read over the summer. They got me thinking about Buffalo’s AFL dynasty of the mid-60’s and its AFC dynasty of the early 90’s. Even though they never won Super Bowls, they still achieved a lot and are worthy of our pride and respect. So just how “great” were they? The following analysis is my attempt to position these two cherished teams within the context of pro football history. I’ll revisit this unfinished project during the offseason, but anyone who wants to take it up in the meantime is more than welcome to do so!

 

First, how are we to define and measure a team’s “greatness,” anyway? One needs to have some sort of scoring system if one wants to compare teams from different eras. The scoring system is the most important part of my historical analysis project, so your feedback is encouraged! I’m presenting a draft of one below, as it is currently conceived in my head, so that you get a better sense of what I think we should value and prioritize. Pay attention to the value ratios and to the value equivalencies. Championships and time lengths of success are paramount, of course, but I also want to support the teams whose qualitative legacies can’t be quantitatively measured solely in terms of trophies and win/loss records. So to that effect, I’ve introduced (admittedly horribly subjective) bonus points for the last three items on my criteria list. Later on, I’ll need to somehow employ tiers of bonus points for these factors. Also, be aware that the NFL and the Pro Football Hall of Fame both officially recognize AFC/NFC conference titles as equivalent to pre-1970 AFL/NFL league titles. This helps us compare the pre-1966 teams with the Super Bowl era teams. Without further ado:

 

1. Regular season records: 1 point for each season between 0.500-0.625 (i.e. a 9-7 or 10-6 record), 2 points for each between 0.625-0.750 (i.e. 11-5 or 12-4), 4 points for each above 0.750 (13-3, 14-2, or 15-1), 8 points for going undefeated (1934 Bears, 1942 Bears, 1948 AAFC Browns, 1972 Dolphins, 2007 **Patriots), +1 bonus point for each division title.

2. Postseason performances: 2 points for a wild-card round victory followed by a loss in the divisional round, 5 points for a conference final loss or a pre-Super Bowl era title game loss, 12 points for a Super Bowl loss or a pre-Super Bowl era title game victory, 27 points for a Super Bowl victory, +3 bonus points for a league title before the 1966 season.

3. Hall of Famers: 1 point for any minor role player (such as Lofton for the Bills), 3 points for a “contributor” (owner or GM), 5 points for a major role player, 10 points for a head coach, +5 bonus points for a major role player at the QB position.

4. League development bonus points: reserved for teams that helped revolutionize the NFL’s organizational structure and intra-team protocols. Examples: Lambeau Packers, Halas Bears, Paul Brown’s Browns, Ewbank/Shula Colts, and Lombardi Packers. I would include our 1960’s Bills because they played a critical role in legitimizing the fledgling AFL with their more traditional style of successful football, relative to the rest of the league at that time.

5. X’s and O’s bonus points: reserved for teams that innovated the modern (post-1932) era of pro football from a strategic and schematic viewpoint. Examples: Hank Stram Chiefs, Don Shula Dolphins (3-4 D), Bill Walsh 49ers (West Coast O), Buddy Ryan Bears (46 D), and Mike Martz Rams (Greatest Show on Turf). I would include our early 1990’s Bills for the no-huddle K-Gun offense.

6. Cultural impact bonus points: reserved for teams that extended the sport’s popularity beyond football fans and into American culture. Examples: Tom Landry Cowboys, Al Davis Raiders, Chuck Noll Steelers, Brett Favre Packers, and Peyton Manning Colts. I would include the Sean McDermott Bills for winning the Super Bowl during the COVID-19 pandemic and elevating the spirits of all Americans everywhere (outside perhaps Kansas City). Yeah that’s right…I went there…

 

Next, I have decided to temporally define each team by either a marquee player (i.e. a QB) or a dominant head coach. Look no further than the 2020 season to see why I choose to define successful football organizations this way. Who are the top 10 teams this year? I’d say KC, Buffalo, Green Bay, New Orleans, Seattle, Tennessee, Pittsburgh, Baltimore, Tampa Bay, and Indianapolis (no offense to Cleveland, Miami, Arizona, or the Rams). 6 of those top 10 feature likely Hall of Fame QB’s, Mahomes is Mahomes, Allen and Tannehill are having amazing seasons, and Jackson was last year’s MVP. Also, think about the 7 Super Bowl-winning head coaches working in the NFL right now: 5 of them are in my 2020 top 10, while the other 2 are Belichick and Pederson (whose QB situations have been complete disasters this year).

 

Ok, so a rough guess of how the ranking may end up once a scoring system is finalized:

 

1. Marsha **Patriots, 2001-2019 **

2. Montana + Young 49ers, 1981-1998 **

3. Noll Steelers, 1972-1990 **

4. Lombardi Packers, 1959-1967

5. Aikman Cowboys, 1991-1998

6. Paul Brown + Blanton Collier Browns, 1946-1969 **

7. Halas Bears, 1920-1967 **

8. Lambeau Packers, 1921-1947 **

9. Landry Cowboys, 1966-1985 **

10. Davis + Rauch + Madden + Flores Raiders, 1963-1985 **

11. Shula Dolphins, 1970-1995 **

12. Gibbs Redskins, 1982-1992

13. Elway Broncos, 1983-1998 **

14. Unitas Colts, 1957-1971 **

15. Roethlisberger Steelers, 2004-ONGOING **

16. Parcells Giants, 1984-1990

17. Grant Vikings, 1968-1982 **

18. KELLY BILLS, 1988-1996

19. Warner Rams, 1999-2004

20. Carroll Seahawks, 2010-ONGOING

21. Manning Colts, 1999-2010

22. Stram Chiefs, 1960-1973

23. Favre Packers, 1992-2007 **

24. Ditka Bears, 1984-1991

25. Manning Giants, 2005-2016

26. Manning Broncos, 2011-2016

27. Rodgers Packers, 2009-ONGOING

28. Brees Saints, 2006-ONGOING **

29. Reid Chiefs, 2013-ONGOING

30. KEMP BILLS, 1962-1966

31. ALLEN BILLS, 2019-ONGOING (oh that’s right…I went there again…)

 

** - Double asterisks denote timespans that will likely be split into separate eras (perhaps into pairings of 1 QB + 1 HC). The timespans spanning 15+ years bother me. For now, I’m erring on the side of caution by including more seasons than what some might consider reasonable. Eventually I intend to better specify the criteria used to constrain durations of consecutive seasons. Any advice?

 

Can you think of any teams I overlooked in my list of 30 (er, 31!) that you want me to put in the queue? Remember that we’re only interested in teams that could be considered historically greater than the AFL Bills!

 

Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays, everyone!!!

  I did a similar ranking on the old BBMB.  I had the Kelly Bills at 12.  I did not get into a points system and did not go any further back than 1960.  At that time the Roethlesberger Steelers had a chapter or two more to write and NE had several more AFCE titles and Lombardi's to win.  The point I was trying to make was while the team was mired in the drought that the Bills as a franchise were far from being the least successful team in the AFL and NFL.  As a franchise I had the Bills just outside the top 10 teams.  There are many teams like the Chargers, Falcons, Cardinals, and Oilers/Titans who had far less success over their histories.  

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On 12/22/2020 at 4:23 PM, Taro T said:

 

Tampa also was the team the Bills lost to in '88 to make sure they couldn't get home field against Cincy that year.  And also the home of SB XXV.  F### the Bucs.

 

Was that the 10-5 debacle that Bruce had to sit out due to a drug suspension?

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On 12/25/2020 at 10:46 AM, Wacka said:

I seem  to remember that  playoff game  with KC was Montana's last. He got a concussion that knocked him out of the game. He said he had a high pitched wine in his ears after that hit  and that was a big influence  in making him decide to retire. I believe it was Wright, Bruce and someone else that leveled him.

I somehow missed your first sentence.  Montana actually played the following season, losing in the playoffs to the Fish.  That was his last NFL game.

 

We actually obliterated them that season, 44-10.  Close game blown open in the closing minutes of the first half.  Montana got benched.

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1 hour ago, Seasons1992 said:

 

Was that the 10-5 debacle that Bruce had to sit out due to a drug suspension?

 

It was the 10-5 game.

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ComradeKayAdams
On 12/28/2020 at 9:56 AM, RochesterRob said:

  I did a similar ranking on the old BBMB.  I had the Kelly Bills at 12.  I did not get into a points system and did not go any further back than 1960.  At that time the Roethlesberger Steelers had a chapter or two more to write and NE had several more AFCE titles and Lombardi's to win.  The point I was trying to make was while the team was mired in the drought that the Bills as a franchise were far from being the least successful team in the AFL and NFL.  As a franchise I had the Bills just outside the top 10 teams.  There are many teams like the Chargers, Falcons, Cardinals, and Oilers/Titans who had far less success over their histories.  

 

I couldn’t agree more, RochesterRob! Notice how 13 NFL franchises don’t even appear once in my top-30** dynasty ranking. Only 8 other franchises besides Buffalo appear twice, with the Packers the only one to appear more than twice (4 times!). The Bills rank fourth in AFL/AFC titles (6) behind the Patriots (11), Steelers (8), and Broncos (8). They also rank seventh in AFL/AFC championship game appearances (8) behind the Patriots (16), Steelers (16), Raiders (14), Broncos (10), Chargers (9), and Titans (9).

 

Furthermore, 8 other franchises have had playoff droughts of 17+ straight years (Eagles, Giants, WFT, Saints, Cardinals, Steelers, Browns, and Broncos). All but 6 (Cowboys, Vikings, Panthers, Dolphins, Ravens, and Titans) have experienced playoff droughts of at least 9 straight years. Many historically great NFL franchises were bad or continue to be bad for embarrassingly long periods of time: the Patriots before Belichick, the Steelers before Noll, the Browns since their 1999 reboot, the Broncos for the first 17 years of their existence, the Raiders since 2002, the Giants of the 60’s and 70’s, the WFT between WW2 and the 70’s as well as during the ongoing Dan Snyder era, the Packers between Lombardi and Holmgren, the Bears for much of the Super Bowl era, and the 49ers before Montana.

 

Since I think you all get the idea, I’ll move on now to a history topic of sorts that may be of more immediate interest to everyone: historical playoff home field advantage! As you know, I like data and I like to rank things. So the following is a “simple” ranking of all 32 NFL franchises by home playoff game performances (“simple” because I’m not adjusting for strength of opponent differences or differentiating between eras of intra-franchise stadium changes):

 

1. Cardinals: 1.000, 5-0

2. Seahawks: 0.857, 12-2

3. Lions: 0.833, 5-1

4. Packers: 0.826, 19-4

5. Patriots: 0.821, 23-5

6. Raiders: 0.792, 19-5

7. Broncos: 0.773, 17-5

8. BUFFALO BILLS: 0.769, 10-3

9. Jaguars: 0.750, 3-1

10. WFT: 0.722, 13-5

11. 49ers: 0.719, 23-9

12. Panthers: 0.714, 5-2

13. Cowboys: 0.700, 21-9

14. Browns: 0.684, 13-6

15. Dolphins: 0.682, 15-7

16-18. Colts: 0.667, 12-6

16-18. Falcons: 0.667, 6-3

16-18. Texans: 0.667, 4-2

19. Steelers: 0.656, 21-11

20. Eagles: 0.652, 15-8

21. Vikings: 0.636, 14-8

22. Rams: 0.600, 12-8

23. Saints: 0.583, 7-5

24-27. Bears: 0.571, 12-9

24-27. Buccaneers: 0.571, 4-3

24-27. Giants: 0.571, 12-9

24-27. Jets: 0.571, 4-3

28. Titans: 0.545, 6-5

29. Bengals: 0.500, 5-5

30-31. Chargers: 0.429, 6-8

30-31. Ravens: 0.429, 3-4

32. KANSAS CITY CHIEFS: 0.385, 5-8

 

5 of the top 7 ahead of the Bills make sense to me. Let’s ignore the Cards and Lions who haven’t played enough home playoff games. The other 5 are well-known for something unique at their homes: the Seahawks for the stadium noise, the Packers for the cold, the Patriots for the in-stadium cheating shenanigans, the Raiders for the fan criminality, and the Broncos for the altitude. Oh yeah…and did you notice #32?? Comrade Kay noticed. She notices these things.

 

In my opinion, Bills Stadium should be considered the most intimidating playoff venue in the league. It ranks #1 among NFL homes for adverse January weather (#1 for wind, #1 for snow, and #2 behind Lambeau Field for cold temperatures…according to The Weather Channel). All of the related jokes about “NFL Siberia” and “The NFL Night’s Watch” are apt. And while I don’t have decibel noise level data on hand with me, Bills Mafia is kind of loud and crazy, no?

 

My final thought is a forewarning for our beloved 2020 Bills. American football is a sport that historically developed in 5 geographic regions: Ohio (the Ohio League), Western/Upstate NY (the NYPFL), Western Pennsylvania, the Western Great Lakes/Upper Midwest region, and the upper mid-Atlantic/New England Ivy League metro corridor. All 5 regions have foul weather during the late fall and winter that can limit aerial assaults. Despite all the neat modern innovations to the pro game, many of its rules and its strategies still reflect this reality: be able to run the ball and be able to stop the run. As amazing and successful as this regular season has been, the Bills are mediocre-to-poor when it comes to the run game. The Ravens, Titans, and Browns could potentially give the Bills some real trouble in the playoffs if the weather turns south (er, north?). Zach Moss and Vernon Butler are two key examples of players who will need to elevate their postseason play.

 

** - NOTE TO SELF: Hmmm…I forgot the 1951-1957 Bobby Layne Lions, the 1943-1949 Greasy Neale Eagles, the 1936-1948 Sammy Baugh WFT, and the entire 1925-1963 NY Giants Era. Come on, Kay…get it together.

 

EDIT (1/16/21): Corrected the AFL/AFC championship game appearance info in the first paragraph. Must have subconsciously jumped the gun on this postseason by placing the Bills at fifth with 9 appearances... Additional notes to self: consider the 2000-2012 Ray Lewis/Ed Reed Ravens as a single continuous dynasty for my greatest teams ranking. Marquee player continuity criteria need not be limited to QB’s, Kay! Also, use the 1960-1962 George Blanda Titans (er, Oilers) and 1960-1969 Sid Gillman Chargers for scoring system calibration purposes.

 

EDIT (9/13/21): Meant to have Bucs 4-3 at home in the playoffs, not 5-2.

Edited by ComradeKayAdams
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RochesterRob
1 hour ago, ComradeKayAdams said:

 

I couldn’t agree more, RochesterRob! Notice how 13 NFL franchises don’t even appear once in my top-30** dynasty ranking. Only 8 other franchises besides Buffalo appear twice, with the Packers the only one to appear more than twice (4 times!). The Bills rank fourth in AFL/AFC titles (6) behind the **Patriots (11), Steelers (8), and Broncos (8). They also rank fifth in AFL/AFC championship game appearances (9) behind the **Patriots (16), Steelers (16), Raiders (14), and Broncos (10).

 

Furthermore, 8 other franchises have had playoff droughts of 17+ straight years (Eagles, Giants, WFT, Saints, Cardinals, Steelers, Browns, and Broncos). All but 6 (Cowboys, Vikings, Panthers, Dolphins, Ravens, and Titans) have experienced playoff droughts of at least 9 straight years. Many historically great NFL franchises were bad or continue to be bad for embarrassingly long periods of time: the **Patriots before Belichick, the Steelers before Noll, the Browns since their 1999 reboot, the Broncos for the first 17 years of their existence, the Raiders since 2002, the Giants of the 60’s and 70’s, the WFT between WW2 and the 70’s as well as during the ongoing Dan Snyder era, the Packers between Lombardi and Holmgren, the Bears for much of the Super Bowl era, and the 49ers before Montana.

 

Since I think you all get the idea, I’ll move on now to a history topic of sorts that may be of more immediate interest to everyone: historical playoff home field advantage! As you know, I like data and I like to rank things. So the following is a “simple” ranking of all 32 NFL franchises by home playoff game performances (“simple” because I’m not adjusting for strength of opponent differences or differentiating between eras of intra-franchise stadium changes):

 

1. Cardinals: 1.000, 5-0

2. Seahawks: 0.857, 12-2

3. Lions: 0.833, 5-1

4. Packers: 0.826, 19-4

5. **Patriots: 0.821, 23-5

6. Raiders: 0.792, 19-5

7. Broncos: 0.773, 17-5

8. BUFFALO BILLS: 0.769, 10-3

9. Jaguars: 0.750, 3-1

10. WFT: 0.722, 13-5

11. 49ers: 0.719, 23-9

12-13. Buccaneers: 0.714, 5-2

12-13. Panthers: 0.714, 5-2

14. Cowboys: 0.700, 21-9

15. Browns: 0.684, 13-6

16. Dolphins: 0.682, 15-7

17-19. Colts: 0.667, 12-6

17-19. Falcons: 0.667, 6-3

17-19. Texans: 0.667, 4-2

20. Steelers: 0.656, 21-11

21. Eagles: 0.652, 15-8

22. Vikings: 0.636, 14-8

23. Rams: 0.600, 12-8

24. Saints: 0.583, 7-5

25-27. Bears: 0.571, 12-9

25-27. Giants: 0.571, 12-9

25-27. Jets: 0.571, 4-3

28. Titans: 0.545, 6-5

29. Bengals: 0.500, 5-5

30-31. Chargers: 0.429, 6-8

30-31. Ravens: 0.429, 3-4

32. KANSAS CITY CHIEFS: 0.385, 5-8

 

5 of the top 7 ahead of the Bills make sense to me. Let’s ignore the Cards and Lions who haven’t played enough home playoff games. The other 5 are well-known for something unique at their homes: the Seahawks for the stadium noise, the Packers for the cold, the **Patriots for the in-stadium cheating shenanigans, the Raiders for the fan criminality, and the Broncos for the altitude. Oh yeah…and did you notice #32?? Comrade Kay noticed. She notices these things.

 

In my opinion, Bills Stadium should be considered the most intimidating playoff venue in the league. It ranks #1 among NFL homes for adverse January weather (#1 for wind, #1 for snow, and #2 behind Lambeau Field for cold temperatures…according to The Weather Channel). All of the related jokes about “NFL Siberia” and “The NFL Night’s Watch” are apt. And while I don’t have decibel noise level data on hand with me, Bills Mafia is kind of loud and crazy, no?

 

My final thought is a forewarning for our beloved 2020 Bills. American football is a sport that historically developed in 5 geographic regions: Ohio (the Ohio League), Western/Upstate NY (the NYPFL), Western Pennsylvania, the Western Great Lakes/Upper Midwest region, and the upper mid-Atlantic/New England Ivy League metro corridor. All 5 regions have foul weather during the late fall and winter that can limit aerial assaults. Despite all the neat modern innovations to the pro game, many of its rules and its strategies still reflect this reality: be able to run the ball and be able to stop the run. As amazing and successful as this regular season has been, the Bills are mediocre-to-poor when it comes to the run game. The Ravens, Titans, and Browns could potentially give the Bills some real trouble in the playoffs if the weather turns south (er, north?). Zach Moss and Vernon Butler are two key examples of players who will need to elevate their postseason play.

 

** - NOTE TO SELF: Hmmm…I forgot the 1951-1957 Bobby Layne Lions, the 1943-1949 Greasy Neale Eagles, the 1936-1948 Sammy Baugh WFT, and the entire 1925-1963 NY Giants Era. Come on, Kay…get it together.

  Excellent work.  Good observations.  The Steelers from their inception during the early 1930's until 1970 were downright dreadful.  The *Patriots from 1960 until 2000 had a fair won-loss record but seldom took the next step in terms of division or conference champion.  A team like the Oilers would make me pull the hair out of my head.  Successful at the very beginning and sporadic success afterwards topped off with a very impatient owner interfering behind the scenes.  I was very young during the time of the AFL but I would love to see it become the subject of a television series if it could stay true to the personalties that inhabited it.  I've even spent some slow winter days spitballing ideas but never hit on a good approach.

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14 minutes ago, ComradeKayAdams said:

Despite all the neat modern innovations to the pro game, many of its rules and its strategies still reflect this reality: be able to run the ball and be able to stop the run. As amazing and successful as this regular season has been, the Bills are mediocre-to-poor when it comes to the run game. The Ravens, Titans, and Browns could potentially give the Bills some real trouble in the playoffs if the weather turns south (er, north?). Zach Moss and Vernon Butler are two key examples of players who will need to elevate their postseason play.

 

For starters, I have no idea who you are but I appreciate your posts. I certainly hope your writings go further than message boards.

 

I agree with the truth about the running game as it relates to the Bills. They have certainly improved vs. the run, but they've done it by being able to run up the score to make opponents have to drop the run to catch up. Probably my favorite part of the *Patriots game was how they knew the  best thing they could do in the 4th quarter was just keep running to get the game over.

 

That said, while I agree the Ravens, Titans and Browns would be the most challenging in a bad weather, run-centric game, I have confidence in this coaching staff to prepare for a game like that, and even have confidence in the team to execute the plan, in large part because the defense is virtually 100% now. 

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