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The IRS wants to scan your face


Ann
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I don't even use facial recognition on my phone or iPad!

 

Millions of Americans will soon have to scan their faces to access their Internal Revenue Service tax accounts, one of the government's biggest expansions yet of facial recognition software into people's everyday lives.
 

Taxpayers will still be able to file their returns the old-fashioned way. But by this summer, anyone wanting to access their records - including details about child tax credits, payment plans or tax transcripts - on the IRS website will be required to record a video of their face with their computer or smartphone and send it to the private contractor ID.me to confirm their identity.
 

About 70 million Americans who have filed for unemployment insurance, pandemic assistance grants, child tax credit payments or other services have already been scanned by the McLean, Va.-based company, which says its client list includes 540 companies; 30 states, including California, Florida, New York and Texas; and 10 federal agencies, including Social Security, Labor and Veterans Affairs.
 

But ID.me's $86 million contract with the IRS has alarmed researchers and privacy advocates who say they worry about how Americans' facial images and personal data will be safeguarded in the years to come. There is no federal law regulating how the data can be used or shared.
 

The system itself also is drawing complaints. Some people have reported frustrating glitches and hours-long delays that have kept them from important benefits, and researchers have argued the company has overstated the abilities of a face-scanning technology that could wrongly flag people as frauds.
 

Jeramie Scott, senior counsel of the Electronic Privacy Information Center, a research group in Washington, said the IRS's outsourcing of identity checks to a private company could weaken the public's ability to know how information is being used, especially because no federal laws govern how facial recognition should work nationwide.
 

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4 minutes ago, Ann said:

I don't even use facial recognition on my phone or iPad!

 

Millions of Americans will soon have to scan their faces to access their Internal Revenue Service tax accounts, one of the government's biggest expansions yet of facial recognition software into people's everyday lives.
 

Taxpayers will still be able to file their returns the old-fashioned way. But by this summer, anyone wanting to access their records - including details about child tax credits, payment plans or tax transcripts - on the IRS website will be required to record a video of their face with their computer or smartphone and send it to the private contractor ID.me to confirm their identity.
 

About 70 million Americans who have filed for unemployment insurance, pandemic assistance grants, child tax credit payments or other services have already been scanned by the McLean, Va.-based company, which says its client list includes 540 companies; 30 states, including California, Florida, New York and Texas; and 10 federal agencies, including Social Security, Labor and Veterans Affairs.
 

But ID.me's $86 million contract with the IRS has alarmed researchers and privacy advocates who say they worry about how Americans' facial images and personal data will be safeguarded in the years to come. There is no federal law regulating how the data can be used or shared.
 

The system itself also is drawing complaints. Some people have reported frustrating glitches and hours-long delays that have kept them from important benefits, and researchers have argued the company has overstated the abilities of a face-scanning technology that could wrongly flag people as frauds.
 

Jeramie Scott, senior counsel of the Electronic Privacy Information Center, a research group in Washington, said the IRS's outsourcing of identity checks to a private company could weaken the public's ability to know how information is being used, especially because no federal laws govern how facial recognition should work nationwide.
 

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That should work well with the mask perma-mandate.

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In a tax law change seminar right now.

 

For 2022 tax year, ALL 3rd party payers (such as Venmo & Paypal) will have to report on a 1099-K TOTAL payments to you of $600 total.  So if you bought Bills tickets for a group of people and 3 people each paid you $200 your "earnings" WILL be reported to the IRS even though you didn't earn a penny.

 

The threshold had been $20,000.

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21 minutes ago, Taro T said:

In a tax law change seminar right now.

 

For 2022 tax year, ALL 3rd party payers (such as Venmo & Paypal) will have to report on a 1099-K TOTAL payments to you of $600 total.  So if you bought Bills tickets for a group of people and 3 people each paid you $200 your "earnings" WILL be reported to the IRS even though you didn't earn a penny.

 

The threshold had been $20,000.


That is going to cause a lot of issues. There was enough problems a few years back with double issuing 1099s to contractor paid through paypal (the "employer" would issue the contractor a 1099, and so would paypal... so it looked like the contractor was double earning!)

Another disaster in the making.

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They want you to pay taxes on the money that was already taxed, so they can tax you again.  Gotta make sure you are "paying your fair share ".

 

Cause lord knows those "evil rich people" are moving small amounts of money around to avoid taxes

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37 minutes ago, Billsandhorns said:

They want you to pay taxes on the money that was already taxed, so they can tax you again.  Gotta make sure you are "paying your fair share ".

 

Cause lord knows those "evil rich people" are moving small amounts of money around to avoid taxes


What they are trying to do is crush the gig economy that people migrated to when they shut down businesses, and force them back into the jobs they left and don’t want. It’s not coincidental that those jobs are the ones which do/will require vaccination.

 

It’s open warfare.

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  • 2 weeks later...

The IRS won't make you verify your identity with facial recognition after all

 

The IRS announced plans Monday to back away from a third-party facial recognition system that collects biometric data from U.S. taxpayers who want to log in to the agency's online portal.

 

The IRS says it will abandon the technology, built by a contractor called ID.me, in the coming weeks. The agency says it will instead swap in an "additional authentication process" that doesn't collect facial images or video. The two-year contract was worth $86 million.

 

"The IRS takes taxpayer privacy and security seriously, and we understand the concerns that have been raised," IRS Commissioner Chuck Rettig said. "Everyone should feel comfortable with how their personal information is secured, and we are quickly pursuing short-term options that do not involve facial recognition."

 

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