Jump to content

What Are You Smoking?? (meats and vegetables, not intoxicants)


CarpetCrawler
 Share

Recommended Posts

CarpetCrawler

I got a little electric smoker for Christmas and have been waiting for warmer weather to try it out.

 

I'm looking for hints and tips and of course recipies......whatca got???

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by CarpetCrawler
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Start with a pork butt.  They are tough to screw up other than taking it off too early.  

 

1.  Purchase pork butt with fat cap on and bone-in. 

2. Purchase hickory and apple chips.

3. Take pork out and let sit out at room temp while preparing smoker.

4.  Start smoker per manufacturer directions. Use water pan.  Set for 250 degrees.

5.  Score fat cap.

6.  Slather with yellow mustard.

7.  Apply general purpose red rub from store.

8. Smoke until temp reaches 160 degrees.

9.  Wrap in foil with about 1/8 cup of apple juice.

10.  Cook to about 200 degrees.  Probe should go in very easy.  Total cook time is about 1 HR/pound.    Go by tenderness, not time.

11.  Remove from heat and let rest 15 mins.

12.  Remove from foil.

13.  Using heat resistant rubber gloves, remove bone. If done, it will pull out easily.

14. It should now pull apart easily.  Remove fat and any connective tissue.

15.  Serve with sauce on the side.

 

Good luck.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

CarpetCrawler
On 2/5/2021 at 1:15 AM, Just Joshin said:

Start with a pork butt.  They are tough to screw up other than taking it off too early.  

 

1.  Purchase pork butt with fat cap on and bone-in. 

2. Purchase hickory and apple chips.

3. Take pork out and let sit out at room temp while preparing smoker.

4.  Start smoker per manufacturer directions. Use water pan.  Set for 250 degrees.

5.  Score fat cap.

6.  Slather with yellow mustard.

7.  Apply general purpose red rub from store.

8. Smoke until temp reaches 160 degrees.

9.  Wrap in foil with about 1/8 cup of apple juice.

10.  Cook to about 200 degrees.  Probe should go in very easy.  Total cook time is about 1 HR/pound.    Go by tenderness, not time.

11.  Remove from heat and let rest 15 mins.

12.  Remove from foil.

13.  Using heat resistant rubber gloves, remove bone. If done, it will pull out easily.

14. It should now pull apart easily.  Remove fat and any connective tissue.

15.  Serve with sauce on the side.

 

Good luck.

 

Thanks, great instructions. do you use 50/50 hickory and apple? do you soak the wood chips first?

 

Also, is that the same as a pork shoulder???  That's what I see in my supermarket. Or would it work the same with that?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

CarpetCrawler
On 2/4/2021 at 9:39 PM, KD in CA said:

I've mostly transitioned to edibles at this point.   Oh, wait....

 

 

 

 

Do tell.......

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...
CarpetCrawler
On 2/5/2021 at 1:15 AM, Just Joshin said:

Start with a pork butt.  They are tough to screw up other than taking it off too early.  

 

1.  Purchase pork butt with fat cap on and bone-in. 

2. Purchase hickory and apple chips.

3. Take pork out and let sit out at room temp while preparing smoker.

4.  Start smoker per manufacturer directions. Use water pan.  Set for 250 degrees.

5.  Score fat cap.

6.  Slather with yellow mustard.

7.  Apply general purpose red rub from store.

8. Smoke until temp reaches 160 degrees.

9.  Wrap in foil with about 1/8 cup of apple juice.

10.  Cook to about 200 degrees.  Probe should go in very easy.  Total cook time is about 1 HR/pound.    Go by tenderness, not time.

11.  Remove from heat and let rest 15 mins.

12.  Remove from foil.

13.  Using heat resistant rubber gloves, remove bone. If done, it will pull out easily.

14. It should now pull apart easily.  Remove fat and any connective tissue.

15.  Serve with sauce on the side.

 

Good luck.

 

I finally got to season the smoker, now I'm ready to get going. This looks like a good recipe to start with, thanks again.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, CarpetCrawler said:

 

I finally got to season the smoker, now I'm ready to get going. This looks like a good recipe to start with, thanks again.

 

The directions you are referring to utilize what is called the "Texas Crutch," which is a technique using aluminum foil to speed through  the "stall" that meats go through while slow cooking, instead of just letting it go on its own.

You can look up the "stall" for pork butt/shoulder for the technical explanation, but it occurs around 160 degrees for a pork butt.

At that point, the temp will not rise for a couple hours as the internal moisture sweats out.

The Texas Crutch speeds through that process.

I use 230 degrees, have a meat thermometer stuck in and the display on the outside.

A meat thermometer is the most important tool in cooking meat.

If I use the Texas Crutch, I wrap it once it hits 163, or when it hits the stall. I take it out at 200, and let it rest for an hour.

That is the only time I open the smoker, or in my case a Primo XL ceramic.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

CarpetCrawler
9 hours ago, Sherpa said:

 

The directions you are referring to utilize what is called the "Texas Crutch," which is a technique using aluminum foil to speed through  the "stall" that meats go through while slow cooking, instead of just letting it go on its own.

You can look up the "stall" for pork butt/shoulder for the technical explanation, but it occurs around 160 degrees for a pork butt.

At that point, the temp will not rise for a couple hours as the internal moisture sweats out.

The Texas Crutch speeds through that process.

I use 230 degrees, have a meat thermometer stuck in and the display on the outside.

A meat thermometer is the most important tool in cooking meat.

If I use the Texas Crutch, I wrap it once it hits 163, or when it hits the stall. I take it out at 200, and let it rest for an hour.

That is the only time I open the smoker, or in my case a Primo XL ceramic.

 

Wow, thanks so much, this is exactly the kind of help I was hoping for. I'll read up on the "Texas Ctutch" and be prepared. I did use a quick method for making baby back ribs on my gas grill last summer that involved wrapping them in foil for the last hour, so It seems maybe I used the process without knowing it. They were the best ribs I ever made, as per my family.

 

I'm just starting out with smoking thanks to some prompting from @The Guy In Pants, I was hoping to use it today, but it's rainy and windy as hell, I'm off Easter Monday, if the weather is good then, I'll hope to get my first smoke going then. 

 

Thanks again, I'd be glad to hear any other tips or advice you have. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

For baby back ribs, I use the 2-2-1 method.


~230, indirect heat

2 hours direct on grate

2 hours wrapped in foil (add apple juice before sealing package)

1 hour back on grill grate (sauce during this period if desired)

 

I have found 1 3/4 hours wrapped works on my grill because while you want them tender, you don’t want the rack falling apart before you get them off the grill.

  • Like 3
  • Cheers 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just Joshin
11 hours ago, Sherpa said:

 

The directions you are referring to utilize what is called the "Texas Crutch," which is a technique using aluminum foil to speed through  the "stall" that meats go through while slow cooking, instead of just letting it go on its own.

You can look up the "stall" for pork butt/shoulder for the technical explanation, but it occurs around 160 degrees for a pork butt.

At that point, the temp will not rise for a couple hours as the internal moisture sweats out.

The Texas Crutch speeds through that process.

I use 230 degrees, have a meat thermometer stuck in and the display on the outside.

A meat thermometer is the most important tool in cooking meat.

If I use the Texas Crutch, I wrap it once it hits 163, or when it hits the stall. I take it out at 200, and let it rest for an hour.

That is the only time I open the smoker, or in my case a Primo XL ceramic.

Spot on.  With a ceramic cooker no need to look.  If using a normal smoker I would occasionally spritz.  For a pork butt I would use a mix of apple juice, apple cider and apple bourbon.  When wrapping put some of the apple liquid in with the meat.

Edited by Just Joshin
  • Cheers 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just Joshin
48 minutes ago, KD in CA said:

For baby back ribs, I use the 2-2-1 method.


~230, indirect heat

2 hours direct on grate

2 hours wrapped in foil (add apple juice before sealing package)

1 hour back on grill grate (sauce during this period if desired)

 

I have found 1 3/4 hours wrapped works on my grill because while you want them tender, you don’t want the rack falling apart before you get them off the grill.

Agree you do not need 2 hrs wrapped.  If using spareribs, then the 3-2-1 is needed as they are larger.  I prefer babybacks - harder than spares but taste better IMO.

  • Cheers 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, KD in CA said:

For baby back ribs, I use the 2-2-1 method.


~230, indirect heat

2 hours direct on grate

2 hours wrapped in foil (add apple juice before sealing package)

1 hour back on grill grate (sauce during this period if desired)

 

I have found 1 3/4 hours wrapped works on my grill because while you want them tender, you don’t want the rack falling apart before you get them off the grill.

 

That is exactly how I do ribs, but if I have less than 5 hours I use 250.

I use baby backs.

 

For Easter I'll do a tenderloin.

225 indirect until 127 internal.

Take the meat off and wrap in foil.

Open up al the grates and lid, and have the Digi Q temp controller fan the lump charcoal until flame.

Take the foil off, sear on the heat for three mins each side.

Re-wrap in aluminum for 20-30 mins.

 

Here's another tip I've learned.

For the best tenderizing medium if needing to tenderize a rougher cut, or even a good one, use pineapple juice. Not the fake concentrate. Get a pineapple.

I stick the pineapple in the blender, get it to a pulp, then use the juice for the tenderizing agent.

Best performance, and doesn't impart any flavor.

Some specific enzyme is pineapple is the reason.

Edited by Sherpa
  • FANtastic 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

CarpetCrawler
5 hours ago, Sherpa said:

 

That is exactly how I do ribs, but if I have less than 5 hours I use 250.

I use baby backs.

 

For Easter I'll do a tenderloin.

225 indirect until 127 internal.

Take the meat off and wrap in foil.

Open up al the grates and lid, and have the Digi Q temp controller fan the lump charcoal until flame.

Take the foil off, sear on the heat for three mins each side.

Re-wrap in aluminum for 20-30 mins.

 

Here's another tip I've learned.

For the best tenderizing medium if needing to tenderize a rougher cut, or even a good one, use pineapple juice. Not the fake concentrate. Get a pineapple.

I stick the pineapple in the blender, get it to a pulp, then use the juice for the tenderizing agent.

Best performance, and doesn't impart any flavor.

Some specific enzyme is pineapple is the reason.

 

I'm learning new things here every day, thanks again. 

 

I found this about pineapple as a meat tenderizer....

 

https://science.howstuffworks.com/innovation/edible-innovations/pineapple-enzyme-tenderize-steak1.htm

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

CarpetCrawler
8 hours ago, KD in CA said:

For baby back ribs, I use the 2-2-1 method.


~230, indirect heat

2 hours direct on grate

2 hours wrapped in foil (add apple juice before sealing package)

1 hour back on grill grate (sauce during this period if desired)

 

I have found 1 3/4 hours wrapped works on my grill because while you want them tender, you don’t want the rack falling apart before you get them off the grill.

 

That's similar to the method I used last summer, but the temps were higher and the times shorter. I think it was 300* and 45min/1 hour (with cider vinegar in the foil)/30min back on the grill. They were damn good, I can't wait to use your method. Thanks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, The Guy In Pants said:

That is one thing I have not smoked yet but is on my list; baby back ribs. 

 

They are the best item to start.

Almost impossible to screw up.

Time is very predictable, five to 5 and a half hours.

If you lose indirect heat grill space, curl them into a circle and use a skewer to keep the circular shape.

No temp monitoring. Sight alone and a few other criteria tell you when they're done.

 

Pork shoulder/butt is next easiest, but the timing can vary a couple hours. Using 225, I plan 12-14 hours, but it must get to at least 195, and 200 is better.

Brisket a little more difficult.

Not mentioned, but important, is to take the meat out and let it climb to near room temp before starting. Provides for more uniform temps from the outside to the middle.

I've found the times recommended for this on the internet are oddly inaccurate.

I stick a temp probe in after a half hour outside the refrigerator, looking for at least 58 to start cooking, but not more than 60. Usually takes an hour and a half. (Not necessary with ribs).

 

I have found this especially important with lower fat items, like turkey.

 

Edited by Sherpa
  • Like 1
  • Cheers 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Terms of Use, Privacy Policy, We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue., Guidelines