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United Flight 328 Engine Explodes


Foxx
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13 minutes ago, mead107 said:

I like it when they empty the poop holding tank when you n the air 

 

 

I'd be willing to bet a good number of those passengers had to change their drawers after landing.

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14 minutes ago, Foxx said:

I'd be willing to bet a good number of those passengers had to change their drawers after landing.

 

They emptied their personal poop holding tanks mid-flight?

 

Thank Goodness we can make light of this. Everyone on board was unlucky, then lucky.

 

 

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Anything can fall off due to a "malfunction," including people.

Lavatory waste is removed by opening a valve that can only be accessed on the exterior of the aircraft on the ground.

There is no in flight option.

 

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8 hours ago, snafu said:

 

They emptied their personal poop holding tanks mid-flight?

 

Thank Goodness we can make light of this. Everyone on board was unlucky, then lucky.

 

 

 

I'm pretty good in a crisis, but not sure how I'd come out after that kind of physical peril, especially if my wife (who'd be hysterical) and kids were with me.

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18 minutes ago, KD in CA said:

 

I'm pretty good in a crisis, but not sure how I'd come out after that kind of physical peril, especially if my wife (who'd be hysterical) and kids were with me.

 

I know my wife would be saying "&#%$ this shit, we're taking Greyhound."

 

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I understand why folks would be really anxious over something like this, but it's probably the most "practiced" emergency situation trained to deal with. Almost always goes really smoothly as each goy knows his/her roll.

The 777 can easily fly on one engine, and the landing would be no issue at the weight of a Denver to Honolulu flight. 

From the video, as ugly as the engine was, it looked to me like it was still producing some small amount of thrust, which would make it a bit easier.

The Pratt and Whitney engines with the follow fan blades used on those United 777's are not used by other airlines in the US. They use either GE or Rolls Royce.

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13 hours ago, Sherpa said:

I understand why folks would be really anxious over something like this, but it's probably the most "practiced" emergency situation trained to deal with. Almost always goes really smoothly as each goy knows his/her roll.

The 777 can easily fly on one engine, and the landing would be no issue at the weight of a Denver to Honolulu flight. 

From the video, as ugly as the engine was, it looked to me like it was still producing some small amount of thrust, which would make it a bit easier.

The Pratt and Whitney engines with the follow fan blades used on those United 777's are not used by other airlines in the US. They use either GE or Rolls Royce.

 

Didn't know you were here, Sherpa!

 

I listened to the ATC this morning, and the pilots were totally prepared to handle this. 

 

My brother works for GE and this kind of thing leads to 80-hour workweeks and visits to manufacturing sites.

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On 2/21/2021 at 1:08 PM, DC Tom said:

Although someone got very damn lucky with that.

 

My best friend lives 3 miles from the outer engine ring's landing site in CO. She was slightly freaked out.

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On 2/21/2021 at 7:16 PM, Sherpa said:

Anything can fall off due to a "malfunction," including people.

Lavatory waste is removed by opening a valve that can only be accessed on the exterior of the aircraft on the ground.

There is no in flight option.

 

Then I guess there is no point in flying directly over Gillette stadium.

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FAA orders inspections of some Boeing 777 engines after United fire

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) said on Tuesday it was ordering immediate inspections of Boeing 777 planes with Pratt & Whitney PW4000 engines before further flights after an engine failed on a United flight on Saturday.

 

The engines are used on 128 older versions of the plane accounting for less than 10% of the more than 1,600 777s delivered and only a handful of airlines in the United States, South Korea and Japan were operating them recently.

 

Operators must conduct a thermal acoustic image inspection of the large titanium fan blades on each engine, the FAA said. ...

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